Economics

The Ethnic Riots of 1905 and 1918 in Baku and Their Origins

Edited from: “Baku: From Cosmopolitan City to National Capital of Azerbaijan”
by Shamkhal Abilov, Qafqaz University

Keywords: Baku, ethnic riots, Musavat, Shaumian, Dashnak Party, March Events, the Wild Division

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Cosmopolitan Baku During the Soviet Period

Edited from: “Baku: From Cosmopolitan City to National Capital of Azerbaijan”
by Shamkhal Abilov, Qafqaz University

Keywords: Baku, Soviet era, proletariat, Bakintsi, Jews, Armenians, ethnic minorities, migration

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Socialism and Armenian Revolutionaries

Edited from: “‘The Caucasus is in the Hands of Revolutionaries’: Circulation, Connections, and the Caucasian Armenians”
by Houri Berberian, California State University, Long Beach

Keywords: socialism, revolutionary, nationalism, Ottoman, European, Iran, Russia, Armenia, Marxist

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Revolutionaries and the Printed Word

Edited from: “‘The Caucasus is in the Hands of Revolutionaries’: Circulation, Connections, and the Caucasian Armenians”
by Houri Berberian, California State University, Long Beach

Keywords: Marx, Das Capital, Russian, literacy, Ottoman, Caucasus, Iran, oil fields, Baku, hayduk, literacy, ARF, revolution

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A Brief Historical Characterization of Baku

Edited from: “The Move South: the Emergence of Baku as a Socio-Cultural and Educational Center of the Late-Nineteenth-Early Twentieth Century Azerbaijani Turkish Intelligentsia”
by Aimee Dobbs, Indiana University

Keywords: Baku, Bakinskaia guberniia, oil boom, intelligentsia

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A Brief Characterization of the Azerbaijani Intelligentsia

Edited from: “The Move South: the Emergence of Baku as a Socio-Cultural and Educational Center of the Late-Nineteenth-Early Twentieth Century Azerbaijani Turkish Intelligentsia”
by Aimee Dobbs, Indiana University

Keywords: Azerbaijani Turkish intelligentsia, ulema, indigenous elite

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Facilitators of Educational and Socio-Conceptual Change in Baku During the Modern Age

Edited from: “The Move South: the Emergence of Baku as a Socio-Cultural and Educational Center of the Late-Nineteenth-Early Twentieth Century Azerbaijani Turkish Intelligentsia”
by Aimee Dobbs, Indiana University

Keywords: Urban Reform, Duma, voting enfranchisement, three-tier system, Shi’a məclis, education

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Modern Schools in Baku

Edited from: “The Move South: the Emergence of Baku as a Socio-Cultural and Educational Center of the Late-Nineteenth-Early Twentieth Century Azerbaijani Turkish Intelligentsia”
by Aimee Dobbs, Indiana University

Keywords: Baku, Modern school, modernization campaign, night schools, Russification, Kaspii

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Elnur Asadov: An Azeribaijan Migrant in Moscow

Edited from: “(Un)Welcome Guests: Caucasus Traders in Late Soviet Leningrad and Moscow”
by Jeff Sahadeo, Carleton University

Keywords: friendship of the peoples, Brezhnev, Azerbaijan, Moscow, informal economy

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Ethnic Networks in the Informal Economies of Moscow

Edited from: “(Un)Welcome Guests: Caucasus Traders in Late Soviet Leningrad and Moscow”
by Jeff Sahadeo, Carleton University

Keywords: ethnoscape, ethnic, Azerbaijan, friendship of the peoples, Moscow, bounded solidarity

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Disclaimer: The American Research Institute of the South Caucasus (ARISC) does not  endorse the views of the papers and is not responsible for any inaccuracies.  These curricular materials were developed from papers presented at the “Caucasus Connections” Conference, and we have left the authors’ views and the data intact.

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